Difference between revisions of "Feedback database"

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==See also==
 
==See also==
 
* [[Rubrics]]
 
* [[Rubrics]]
 +
* [[Spreadsheet tips for grading]]
 +
  
 
<references/>
 
<references/>

Latest revision as of 08:31, 12 October 2019


Grading major projects, essays, presentations, and other major assignments can be difficult, especially for more larger classes. Students expect and deserve fairly detailed feedback and justification for the grades they receive. Feedback should describe the various strengths and weaknesses of a student’s performance – exactly what s/he did well, and where s/he lacks or needs improvement. Feedback is also an opportunity to provide students specific advice on how to improve.

A common practice for grading such work is a feedback database or grading bank. Since many students make similar errors, or show similar strengths or shortcomings, writing out the same feedback for each student is time-consuming. The more efficient method is to create a “database” the first time you grade an assignment. This is a text file, a word processor file, or a spreadsheet, containing the various kinds of comments that you need to provide to students. These comments can be copied and pasted (and perhaps modified and personalized a bit) from the database into an email or printout for each student.


1 Examples

1.1 Simple example

Let’s say that you are grading an essay assignment, and are watching videos of the students’ presentations. You can create a database file as you grade it for the first time. While grading, you can use this as a source for specific feedback to students. As you grade the same kind of assignment later, you can add to it, and draw from it to give feedback whenever you grade the same kind of assignment. Let’s say that in the process of grading the essays, you’ve had to write the same kinds of comments to several or many students, like these.

You have a well-defined topic here.

The topic is quite interesting, and quite relevant to ____ research. However, most or all the sources seem to be general educational studies, and none seems to be empirical studies of L2 acquisition or CLT classrooms, or other aspects of interaction in L2.

A more specific objective could be specified in the intro – e.g., types of studies, specific research question.

The first articles reviewed doesn’t seem to be an empirical study, but a theoretical or other non-empirical source – in which case, it would be better to discuss this briefly in a background section before the lit review.

More specific but concise discussion of some of the articles would be good.

The research discussed here would be more appropriate to a background section before a proper lit review of empirical SLA studies.

There needs to be a discussion section, in which you tie everything together, e.g., connecting these general studies with SLA research, and identifying specific needs and directions for future research.

There are some wordy expressions, and too many subjective / 1st person expressions for academic writing.

References at the end need to be in proper APA format – please refer to the online handout on APA that we discussed in class.

In the lit review, more details about the studies are needed – their research design / type of study, etc., so the reader knows what kind of studies they are.

More more detailed discussion of the findings and implications are needed.

The discussion is kind of general here. For a broad area like this, the lit review covers rather few studies.

The discussion section presents good critique and analysis of the implications of the research.

The criticisms of ___ are rather vague or general – more specific critique and analysis are needed here.

...



Then these can be copied and pasted as needed into comments for another student, e.g.:

Sally:

You have a well-defined topic here. However, a more specific objective could be specified in the intro – e.g., types of studies, specific research question. In the lit review, more details about the studies are needed – their research design / type of study, etc., so the reader knows what kind of studies they are. But the discussion section presents good critique and analysis of the implications of the research. However, the criticisms of the Tomasello study are somewhat vague or general – more specific critique and analysis are needed here. References at the end need to be in proper APA format – please refer to the online handout on APA that we discussed in class.


2 Guidelines

When giving feedback, specifics are helpful, and such a database can make this work easier. It’s helpful to provide some positive feedback – even if it’s not a good paper, at least try to find something positive to comment on; otherwise, a fully negative set of comments may seem mean-hearted. Even good students need positive feedback, because they need to know what their strengths are, so they can build on them or feel good about them. When giving negative feedback, it’s best to also give specific advice about what they can do to improve – e.g., something they can refer to, something they can read for more background knowledge on the topic, some references that you know of, or specific suggestions for better research, study, or preparation skills. Again, negative comments with no advice that they can act on can make you look unkind or uncaring, or might make them too discouraged to try to improve.


3 Grading bank + rubrics

Grading banks can also be used in conjunction with grading rubrics. A rubrics can be done in a spreadsheet, along with a column for comments for each student. The spreadsheet can be used for emailing students feedback on rubric categories and comments via email merge. Similarly, a Google Form can be constructed based on rubric categories, and checkboxes for common issues or comments. Each rubric category corresponds to an item in the online form, with checkboxes; each checkbox contains a commonly used comment. The instructor can fill out a form for each student, tick the appropriate checkboxes, and submit the form, which goes into a spreadsheet, which the instructor can then use for grade records. From the spreadsheet, the instructor can create an email merge to send each student feedback for rubric criteria and comments. See the page on spreadsheet tips for grading for more.


3.1 Within a document

A rubric can be printed out, with key items underlined or highlighted to draw students' attention to particular issues or strengths in the assignment. Similarly, a Google Doc rubric can simply be pasted into a students' file or online submission, to provide rubric feedback and comments, like the example below.

Community service project proposal: Evaluation
Group: Alice Cooper, Tom Petty, Iggy Pop, Patti Smith; Project: Lifestraw
# Criteria (My comments are in blue) Score (1-10)
01 Rationale, goals, objectives – Clear rationale & explanation of why the project is needed, goals, and its benefits
Which group / people / areas are you targeting, specifically? What kinds of areas are you priority? Since the Lifestraw and Waka are already existing technologies, what exactly are you proposing that is novel or inventive?
5
02 Contents – Sufficient contents & explanations
What aspects of your concept are novel, creative, innovative…?
7
03 Project details – Sufficient details & explanations
Where do you want to carry out the project, and how are these devices to work together in your concept?
7
04 Other details – Timeline, budget, participants, etc., as necessary
Few details here.
8
05 Explanations – Clear explanations, easy to understand follow;
It’s not clear what new ideas are presented here.
8
06 Clarity & expression - Clear expressions & style; clear sentences; writing that shows sufficient work, revision, & proofreading 8
07 Organization - Well organized; clear intro & conclusion
Weak conclusion
8
08 Format - Readable; appropriate formatting. Also, if used, suitable and well-done graphics, tables, charts, graphs, etc. (not required)
Long paragraphs; hard to follow.
7
09 Value – Overall social, practical and scientific value & benefit; creativity and originality
7
10 Persuasiveness - Overall, the proposal would be persuasive and interesting to a professional audience 5
Grade 70


3.2 From a spreadsheet

Rubric evaluation can be done in a spreadsheet, with a column for extra comments from a feedback database. The following example shows a rubric for group presentations. Group identifiers are included, so the instructor can easily sort the spreadsheet by groups. After entering comments, the feedback can be emailed to students via email merge. See the page on spreadsheet tips for grading for more.


id # name grp 1rat 2cont 3detail 4klar 5org 6vox 7intaxn 8ppt 9eq 10efx score com1 com2
2019362479 Alice Cooper d1.g1 9.0 10.0 10.0 9.8 10.0 10.0 9.7 9.8 10.0 8.8 97.1 A clearer case can be made for why this is unhealthy, or regarding its negative effects, or why this is a significant issue. Good explanations here of reasons for this belief, though more systematic explanation of this would be good. For addressing this problem, more specific, effective, or convincing ideas can be developed here. A great topic, and nice debunking here. For the PPT, the text size and layout could be improved a bit, along with more key terms or talking points in the slides; occasionally, more graphics or pictures could be included for memorable better visual aids.
2020362028 Miles Davis d1.g1 9.0 9.5 10.0 9.5 9.8 8.5 8.8 9.7 9.8 8.5 93.1 A clearer case can be made for why this is unhealthy, or regarding its negative effects, or why this is a significant issue. For addressing this problem, more specific, effective, or convincing ideas can be developed here. It seemed some contents (the chemistry of Ge) were a bit beyond what you were comfortable with. A great topic, and nice debunking here. For the PPT, the text size and layout could be improved a bit, along with more key terms or talking points in the slides; occasionally, more graphics or pictures could be included for memorable better visual aids.
2020362028 Bruno Mars d1.g1 10.0 9.0 10.0 9.5 9.8 10.0 9.6 9.7 9.0 9.5 96.1 For addressing this problem, more specific, effective, or convincing ideas can be developed here. This was a bit brief; more contents and details would be good. A great topic, and nice debunking here. For the PPT, the text size and layout could be improved a bit, along with more key terms or talking points in the slides; occasionally, more graphics or pictures could be included for memorable better visual aids.
2021361340 Angela Merkel d1.g1 9.0 9.0 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.2 8.5 9.6 10.0 8.0 90.8 A clearer case can be made for why this is unhealthy, or regarding its negative effects, or why this is a significant issue. For addressing this problem, more specific, effective, or convincing ideas can be developed here. A great topic, and nice debunking here. For the PPT, the text size and layout could be improved a bit, along with more key terms or talking points in the slides; occasionally, more graphics or pictures could be included for memorable better visual aids.
2021361351 Jeremy Corbyn d2.g1 7.5 8.0 7.5 8.0 8.5 7.0 7.0 7.5 6.0 7.0 74.0 More explanation would help regarding why people believe in these creatures, and why such beliefs are unhealthy. More specific ideas for addressing these beliefs would be good. A great topic, and interesting info. A more readable or professional looking font and layout would be good in the PPT, along with more key terms or talking points in the slides. It would help to make a clearer case for why these beliefs are unhealthy. Also, a clearer rationale for why you’ve put aliens with cryptids in one talk would be helpful – I can see how they might belong together, but it would help if you explained more clearly to the audience why these are similar and belong together.
2021362120 Søren Kierkegaard d2.g1 9.5 10.0 10.0 9.8 9.8 10.0 9.0 9.8 10.0 8.8 96.7 Good explanation of why people believe this. More debunking of alien myths would also be good (more about why alien beliefs are misguided). More convincing and effective ideas for addressing these beliefs would be good; some ideas here seemed a bit general or vague; and government restrictions seem unconvincing – what kinds of restrictions, and what about free speech concerns, or the possiblity of restrictions backfiring? A great topic, and interesting info. A more readable or professional looking font and layout would be good in the PPT, along with more key terms or talking points in the slides. It would help to make a clearer case for why these beliefs are unhealthy. Also, a clearer rationale for why you’ve put aliens with cryptids in one talk would be helpful – I can see how they might belong together, but it would help if you explained more clearly to the audience why these are similar and belong together.
2021362481 Weird Al Yankovic d2.g1 9.5 10.0 9.5 9.5 9.8 9.5 9.2 9.6 9.5 8.8 94.9 Good debunking. But Heaven’s Gate is a rather extreme example, and more persuasive reasons or examples could be given here. Some proposed solutions seem vague or general (and the part about social control was unclear); more specific, feasible and effective ideas could be developed here. A great topic, and interesting info. A more readable or professional looking font and layout would be good in the PPT, along with more key terms or talking points in the slides. It would help to make a clearer case for why these beliefs are unhealthy. Also, a clearer rationale for why you’ve put aliens with cryptids in one talk would be helpful – I can see how they might belong together, but it would help if you explained more clearly to the audience why these are similar and belong together.
2021362522 Bernie Sanders d2.g2 7.5 10.0 9.0 8.5 9.5 9.2 8.6 8.5 10.0 8.0 88.8 Some good explanation of why people believe these things and some of the risks. It’s not clear why fan death is included here, as it is more of an urban legend or other type of misconception, not a supersition (it depends on poor understanding of basic science rather than anything magical or unlucky). The one about butterflies was new to me; some other unique supersitions can be discussed here as well. It would help to make a clearer case for why these beliefs are unhealthy. More specific ideas for addressing these beliefs would be good, as some of the ideas here seemed a bbit general or vague. Larger, more readable text is needed in the PPT.
2021362725 Rick Ocasek d2.g2 8.5 10.0 9.0 9.0 9.5 9.0 8.5 8.8 10.0 8.5 90.8 Some good explanations of the problems, but some points seemed a bit general, and more detailed explanations would be good. Some of the proposed solutions seemed a bit vague or general. Persuading believers by presenting evidence is known to backfire oftentimes, for various psychological reasons. It would help to make a clearer case for why these beliefs are unhealthy. More specific ideas for addressing these beliefs would be good, as some of the ideas here seemed a bbit general or vague. Larger, more readable text is needed in the PPT.
2021362177 Ruth B. Ginsburg d2.g2 10.0 9.0 10.0 9.5 9.8 10.0 9.6 9.7 9.0 9.5 96.1 Some good explanations of the problems, but some points seemed a bit general, and more detailed explanations would be good. Some of the proposed solutions seemed a bit vague or general. Persuading believers by presenting evidence is known to backfire oftentimes, for various psychological reasons. It would help to make a clearer case for why these beliefs are unhealthy. More specific ideas for addressing these beliefs would be good, as some of the ideas here seemed a bbit general or vague. Larger, more readable text is needed in the PPT.


3.3 From a Google Form

An instructor can create a Google Form with rubric categories and checkboxes for common items from a feedback database for each category. The instructor can fill out one form for each student, entering a score for each category and checking the relevant checkboxes. After submitting each form, another form can be filled out for another student. The form submissions go into a spreadsheet in Google Drive, which the instructor can access, download, and use for emailing students feedback via email merge. Two out of ten categories from a rubric for essays are shown below, with checkboxes, another blank for extra comments, and a blank for a score for each category.

1a. Focus

[ ] Clear focus throughout the paper
[ ] Appropriate focus
[ ] A bit too broad or general in scope; maybe covers too much for one single paper.
[ ] This could be more focused
[ ] A clearer or more specific focus would be good
[ ] More focus on main proposal(s) or argument(s) could be made clearer throughout the body paragraphs.
[ ] Other: ______
1b. Focus score: _______

2a. Organization & structure

[ ] Good organization
[ ] Adequate organization
[ ] Main points are clearly indicated in the topic sentences of the body paragraphs
[ ] Main points could be more clear or specific in the topic sentences of the body paragraphs
[ ] The main points are not so clear
[ ] The overall organization could be made clearer
[ ] General background info could be left out, or made more succinct, in order to focus more on newer and more specific ideas, arguments, or proposal.
[ ] Better organization of paragraphs and main ideas would be better. Long paragraphs can be split up and organized better, so the main ideas can be developed in more depth.
[ ] Other: _______
2b. Organization score: _______


4 See also